Criminal Subornation of Perjury? Balch Stooges Under the Microscope

Our insiders tell us that U.S. Attorney Jay E. Town (pictured above, right) was allegedly “shaken up” by the jaw-dropping photos of him enjoying cocktails with former Balch & Bingham partner and Alabama Power CEO Mark A. Crosswhite at the Moon Shine Lounge.

Town allegedly told others that the stunning photos were taken in October 2019, not 2017, complicating matters even further.

By October 2019, his office had been fully briefed on the Newsome Conspiracy Case and it marks the same month that FBI agents in Montgomery (the Middle District of Alabama) were dissuaded from pursuing allegations of corruption and criminal obstruction of justice in the Newsome Conspiracy Case.

And who dissuaded them?

Birmingham (the Northern District of Alabama), run by Town.

What we do know is that someone has been lying, even perjured themselves, by saying none of the alleged Newsome co-conspirators ever knew each other.

That appears to be a blatant lie.

Town is in a pickle, especially now that the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Professional Responsibility appears to be probing Town’s alleged misconduct.

What we know:

So why go through all these hoops, skips, and jumps?

Balch & Bingham was allegedly trying to steal Burt Newsome’s legal business servicing banks. Stupidity at its highest, the King of Balch, Schuyler Allen Baker, Jr. (pictured above in the crown costume) vowed to never settle the matter and instead apparently has cost the firm millions in lost revenue and continued, never ending embarrassment.

So does never settle mean engaging in alleged criminal obstruction of justice or subornation of perjury at the highest levels?

Now the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Professional Responsibility and a pending civil RICO lawsuit could force Balch’s level-headed partners to dethrone the King, and finally, after more than five-years of litigation, put these matters behind them.