Strange Fundraising Chair Served as Director of $360,000 Corrupt Bribery Entity

Mike Thompson, the fundraising chairman of Strange’s U.S. Senate campaign was listed as a director of the Alliance for Jobs and the Economy, a tax-exempt entity created in 2015 whose purpose was to funnel $360,000 in bribes to a corrupt politician, former Alabama State Representative Oliver Robinson, according to court filings of the U.S. Department of Justice.

The corrupt bribery entity was created, incorporated with the assistance of Balch & Bingham, the embattled law firm currently under investigation in two federal probes.

The CDLU, which has been investigating Balch & Bingham since last year in regards to the Newsome Conspiracy Case, inspected corporate documents filed with the State of Delaware by the Alliance for Jobs and the Economy and found Thompson was listed as a director of the entity.

The news comes on the heels of the CDLU showing how U.S. Senator Luther Strange allegedly gave a “helping-hand” a year ago to a criminal conspiracy that trampled the Civil Rights of Burt Newsome.

The strong stench of corruption, self-dealing, and unscrupulous conduct surrounding Luther Strange has been confirmed: his most trusted financial booster was linked to a bribery scandal that is an active and ongoing federal investigation.

Mike Thompson appears to have been associated with a corrupt entity that greased the wheels in a disgusting scheme to suppress poor African-Americans in North Birmingham from getting their toxic and contaminated property tested. As Alabama Attorney General, Luther Strange opposed this environmental clean-up.

In recent months, Alabama has been rocked by the Robinson Bribery Scandal, linked to one of Strange’s most ardent financial and political supporters, the embattled law firm Balch & Bingham.

According to U.S. News & World Report, “Federal prosecutors wrote in the charges that the goal [of the Robinson Bribery Scandal] was to protect Drummond Co. and its division ABC Coke ‘from the tremendous potential costs associated with being held responsible for pollution within the affected areas.’ Robinson took a contract with the Birmingham law firm of Balch & Bingham, which represented Drummond. Robinson urged constituents in Birmingham to oppose the Superfund action, claiming it would be bad for the area, and spoke out against the proposed action before the state environmental agency.”

“Robinson’s invoices to the law firm would sometimes be paid through a nonprofit called Alliance for Jobs and the Economy that was created by the Drummond employee, prosecutors said. Robinson was paid $360,000.00 under the contract during 2015 and 2016, prosecutors said,” U.S. News & World Report added.

Balch & Bingham is currently under scrutiny in two federal probes: the Robinson Bribery Scandal; the other involves questionable subcontracts in Mississippi in relationship to the clean-up of the BP oil spill that happened in 2010.